Hans Bonfigt
Monday December 28th, 2015

(Deutsch) Ganz agil vorbei am Ziel

Sorry, this entry is only available in German.

Roland Dürre
Thursday July 4th, 2013

My Agile Manifesto …

🙂 … it might look like this or similar:

The more I think about “acting and behaving in an agile way”, the more I believe it to be a basic principle that makes the difference between the “old world” and the “new world”.

Consequently, “AGILE” might well be the next logical step after “enlightenment” and “using your brains”. Being AGILE also means you have to move consciously all the time between the two opposing ends individuality (what do I want, what can I do, what am I permitted to do,…) and the collective (what do we want, what can we achieve, what are we allowed to do,…).

“AGILE” describes our wish to live our lives in freedom – which, at this place, means “being prepared and capable of living your life in responsibility”. At the same time, you have to follow the principle “promote your own and the life of others, rather than reducing them”.

Being “AGILE” means knowing how to deal with responsibility. Being in favour of what change we need and opposed to what change is detrimental for us.

Being “AGILE” also includes the wish to increase your knowledge and then being able to apply them.  Naturally, models and approaches, methods and concepts are an important result of additional knowledge. …

Consequently, in order to become “AGILE”, we will constantly have to learn new things, do things we are not used to, try strange things and collect experience. We have to understand and comprehend how processes in our social systems function. Thus, the “integrative and systemic understanding” of our enterprises will become the requirement for successful “leadership”.

This is it for now in a nutshell …

I was motivated to write this outpouring on agility by an article in openPM by Stefan Hagen.

RMD
(Translated by EG)

Roland Dürre
Wednesday February 6th, 2013

Entrepreneur’s Diary #87 – It Is Quite Simple …

… and yet so hard!

Today, all you get is a short article: here are just a few citations of remarkable tweets by Nils Pflaeging:

Niels Pflaeging@BetaLeadership 
If you want to kill connectedness: create functional division, departmentalize and allow hierarchy to invade the work #stoos

Niels Pflaeging@BetaLeadership
All that planning doesnt earn you any money. Improving the work and fighting waste does. #stoos

Niels Pflaeging@BetaLeadership 
Functional division, divisionalization and matrix structures ALWAYS result in a loss of accountability. Period. #stoos

That is exactly how I feel and could have come straight from my heart. Consequently, there is nothing left for me to say.

RMD
(Translated by EG)

P.S.
For more articles in my entrepreneur’s diary, click here: Drehscheibe!

Sorry, this entry is only available in German.

Sorry, this entry is only available in German.

Bernhard Findeiss
Wednesday October 26th, 2011

(Deutsch) PM-Forum – Ein persönliches Fazit *Update*

Sorry, this entry is only available in German.

Bernhard Findeiss
Thursday September 8th, 2011

(Deutsch) Der Software Craftsman auf Wanderschaft *Update*

Sorry, this entry is only available in German.

Bernhard Findeiss
Friday September 2nd, 2011

(Deutsch) Software Craftsmanship – Was soll das eigentlich?

Sorry, this entry is only available in German.

Roland Dürre
Thursday July 21st, 2011

My Presentation – Project Management

A selection of German high-school students want to realize an ambitious project sponsored by the “Elite Promotion Program“. The person in charge of the program at the Bavarian Ministry of Education is a good friend of mine. Consequently, he asked me to speak about “Project Management” in front of those young people coming from all over Bavaria.

Trying to keep everything very simple, I  came up with the following presentation. Above all, I wanted to make my young audience understand all the things that go with a project.

Here is the concise manuscript. Enjoy!

mehr »

Roland Dürre
Monday July 12th, 2010

Is Computer Science a Craft?

In our technical IF forum (fachliches IF-Forum) of June, 24th, at Unterhaching, Thomas Vallon made quite a huge impression on our guests when he asked “Is Computer Science a Craft”?

During his presentation, he described parallels between modern software development and building a cathedral that are quite obvious when you take a closer look. In medieval times, building cathedrals was an exceptional craft. Each cathedral was a true mammoth project with its respective challenges.

Indeed, we discover that there are quite a few things they have in common. Besides, we also discover surprising “philosophical” parallels between our self-perception as software developers and those courageous medieval builders and craftsmen.

For instance, it took a very long time to build a cathedral. Sometimes, this led to different architectural epochs being prevalent while a single building was constructed (for example Gothic and Romanesque). In practice, this meant that a cathedral that was still under construction suddenly looked old-fashioned and badly needed renovation.

Since people believed in agility, they changed plans while they were in the process of building. They also modified, demolished and/or re-built entire sections of a building. There is hardly any cathedral where this was not done.

And through the entire process of “development” (while the cathedral was built), the “operation” (that is the basic function of a Lord’s house) had to continue undisturbed.

Apart from that, many cathedrals also prove in an impressive way what the craftsmen concerned with the edifice considered their “professional honour”. For example, many figures on the facade of Notre Dame have been worked with the same degree of accuracy at the back of the building and high up, although the artist certainly must have known that there was hardly going to be another human who would see it in the near future.
Well, this was only for wetting your appetite. If you want to read something really exciting, here is the manuscript.

Thomas Vallon – Ist die Informatik ein Handwerk?

Do read it!

The background images used during the presentation (designed by Johannes Naumann) are also highly recommendable:

Hintergrundbilder zum Vortrag (6)

I was particularly moved when Thomas dedicated the presentation to me as a present for my sixtieth birthday.

Thank you, Thomas!

RMD
(Translated by EG)

P.S.
What a pity that we do not have a video or audio tape of the presentation. But maybe we will manage next time!