Roland Dürre
Wednesday January 23rd, 2013

The Roots of our Mothers …

… and their jobs.

This morning, as I was listening to the Tagesgespräch on Bayern 2 shortly before seven, I hear that only every other mother with “foreign roots“ has a job. And again, I am surprised. Doubly surprised.

As far as the information is concerned, I am surprised because this sentence implies in some way or other that it would be good and right if all mothers had a job. And it also insinuates that all mothers with ”German roots“ have a job. Consequently, I can conclude that the mothers with “foreign roots” are discriminated against, can’t I? Well, I do not really know…

Mind you, there might perhaps be cultural differences between mothers, also concerning mothers remaining by the side of their children.

I also find it bold to substitute the term “immigration background” with “foreign roots”. This linguistic nonsense really means we have gone from bad to worse.

Why can’t we just stop all this nonsense? After all, we are all humans, aren’t we? Do we really have to or want to differentiate between cultural habits – and project them to jobs? And then even go so far as to come to some sorts of conclusions that are more or less wrong?

Or maybe it is all just a camouflaged reproach directed against mothers “with foreign roots“? Meaning that they do not submit to the general social pressure in this country towards being a “working mother“, not willing to work. After all, there are more than enough jobs available for cleaning services in Germany.

RMD
(Translated by EG)

P.S.
I found this article about the same topic on the internet .

1 Kommentar zu “The Roots of our Mothers …”

  1. Chris Wood (Friday January 25th, 2013)

    My wife, (with migration background), stayed 8 years at home with our daughters. We thought this was good, and she enjoyed it. Recently I have discovered that the importance of excellent mothering was then generally exaggerated. A book by Steven Pinker gives much good evidence that the variations in peoples characters, (including intelligence), are largely determined 50-50 by genetics and contacts other than those with parents. The direct contribution by parents is almost entirely genetic, but the parents’ incomes, etc., affect the other contacts.

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