Roland Dürre
Monday April 27th, 2009

Great Orators and their Stories – #5 Klaus-Jürgen Grün

I first met  Klaus-Jürgen Grün in the  Ronneburger Kreis, which was formed around the seminars held by   Rupert Lay.

For me, Klaus-Jürgen is the one philosopher when we are talking about freedom or enlightenment. It comes as no surprise that he is an exceptionately gifted orator. After all, he was taught by  Augustinus Heinrich Graf Henckel von Donnersmarck for several years.

Dr. Grün describes the meaning and value of enlightenment like no other. Listening to him brings you a little closer to understanding man’s secret. You start understanding that it is necessary to accept both people’s shortcomings and individual greatness.

Nobody ever made the difference between anxiety and fear as clear to me as Klaus-Jürgen. During his “truly fearless” lectures, you experience “heaven and hell”, discover deep human abysses and fascinating heights. Nevertheless, his lectures are full of positive thinking.

Klaus-Jürgen communicates that it is “ethics that make morals tolerable”. Morals by themselves are of limited usefulness and can easily get dangerous. Only after morals are supplemented by ethics is human co-existence possible.

His special area is dialectics. Like his other teacher Rupert Lay, he is capable of leading a team to maximum understanding through the power of language and precise definitions. He achieves this through being dialectical.
When teaching, he uses the method of flag-building. This method is a forgotten and ancient human property (which, unfortunately, has never yet been described in wikipedia – so maybe that is something Klaus and I should rectify).

It is not possible for me to describe the astonishing result Klaus gets when working in a pluralistic group, you have to witness it yourself – just like I cannot really do justice to the qualities of the orator Grün in a few sentences. All I can do is to warmly recommend him as a speaker or seminar leader. You will get extraordinary feedback!

It is a major aim of Klaus-Jürgen to take philosophy out of its ivy tower at universities and spread it around in the rest oft he world. He is against teaching philosophers just in order to maintain philosophy as an academic subject. Instead, he wants to make philosophy a beneficial tool for society and economy.

Though we can seldom see each other, Klaus-Jürgen and I have become friends. I wish to express my gratitude for his regularly publishing an article in the IF-blog (it makes me glad and also a little proud).

The next orator I will introduce to you in this series is Rupert Lay.

RMD

(translated by EG)

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